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Egypt's Tahrir Square activists dig in

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Egypt's Tahrir Square activists dig in


They are bracing for the long haul in what some have called the ‘Nile Revolution.’ Two weeks into their protest, Tahrir Square’s activists are settling into a routine.

Conditions are far from ideal, but demonstrators from Cairo and across the country have converged on the square in pursuit of their dream of a Mubarak-free Egypt.

Our correspondent Mohamed Elhamy says the protesters have started a new life in the square and they insist it will continue for as long as this regime remains in power.

For many, everyday life is a struggle, regardless. So this further hardship is well worth the effort.

“I came here to say….this is enough,” said one woman, surrounded by her family. “We are fed up with this situation. I have four kids and my husband has no work, no salary.”

After last week’s violent clashes, there is no room for complacency.

“We don’t sleep well,” said one demonstrator. “We are afraid of being attacked by pro-Mubarak supporters. So we sleep for a while, then wake up to check whether any attack is taking place. We also try to keep the tanks away from us and we guard the entrances of Tahrir Square.”

For one man at least, the extraordinary events of the last fortnight are no surprise. He says he predicted them – in writing.

“I am Mustafa Kamel. I am a journalist,” he told euronews, as he distributed copies of his work in Tahrir Square.

“I wrote a book called ‘The Final Exit’ and a second one about Mubarak called ‘I Love You But From a Distance.’ They predicted the revolution by Egypt’s youth.”

The people of Tahrir Square have made big gains. But, with Hosni Mubarak still in power, their core demand remains, hence determination to carry on their protest for as long as it takes.

Every story can be told in many ways: see the perspectives from Euronews journalists in our other language teams.

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