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Amateur footage captures the horror of Haiti

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Amateur footage captures the horror of Haiti


Video surveillance cameras showed what it was like to be inside Haiti’s Presidential Palace as it was rocked by the magnitude seven earthquake, which struck on January the 12th, 2010.

Clouds of dust invade the building, while walls and ceilings shake and collapse. Furniture and paintings tumble to the ground.

No one was safe from the effects of the massive tremor, which experts describe as the most deadly natural disaster in recent history.

An estimated quarter of a million people were killed, and more than one million left homeless.

A UN soldier used his mobile phone to capture the devastation in the moments following the quake. Luis Diego Morales was near the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption in Port-au-Prince when it was reduced to rubble.

The Archbishop of Haiti was found under the debris,

one of the many victims who lost their lives, trapped in the ruins of the church buildings.

But some were lucky. Amid the despair, there were stories of survival such as that of 70-year-old Ena Zizi. She had been in such a hurry to get to a parish meeting that she had not had any breakfast. She was trapped in the ruins of the church for seven days. Alone and injured, she wondered if she would ever see her family again.

Amid death and devastation on such a scale, the saving of even one life was met with joy. Her rescuers were overcome with emotion.

But it looks like more suffering and uncertainty lie ahead in 2011.

Haiti is in the grip of an epidemic of cholera that has so far claimed more than 3,400 lives.

This amidst ongoing political turmoil after November’s disputed Presidential election.

A report by the UK-based charity Oxfam says relief efforts are being hampered by a lack of leadership from the Haitian government and the international community.

UN figures show less than 45 percent of the billions of euros pledged for reconstruction has actually been disbursed.

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