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Cameron condemns violent student rally

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Cameron condemns violent student rally

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British Prime Minister David Cameron has said the ugly scenes which marred a rally in London against an increase in university tuition fees were unacceptable.
 
On Wednesday protesters smashed up the reception area of Millbank Tower in the capital, the headquarters of Cameron’s Conservative Party.
 
The disturbances broke out after thousands of students had gathered to rally against the coalition government’s plans.
 
Speaking from the G20 in Seoul, Cameron condemned the violence.
 
He said: ’‘We think that the approach of saying that we should support universities, but young people going to universities need to make a contribution to their education, is right. I think in the past, where  frankly quite well-off people went to university like me, for free, paid for by people leaving school at 16 and paying their taxes, that wasn’t right. But look, if people want to protest, of course they have that right, what they don’t have the right to do is to assault police officers, smash up property and threaten people who are just going about their daily lives.’‘
 
Authorities have said the trouble was caused by a hardcore minority. There were around 50 arrests and several police officers were hurt.  
 
An inquiry into the handling of the demonstration has been launched following accusations police underestimated the threat of violence. 
Prime Minister David Cameron has said the ugly scenes which marred a rally in London against an increase in university tuition fees were unacceptable.

On Wednesday protesters smashed up the reception area of Millbank Tower in the capital, the headquarters of Cameron’s Conservative Party.

The disturbances broke out after thousands of students had gathered to rally against the coalition government’s plans.

Speaking from the G20 in Seoul, Cameron condemned the violence, saying:

‘‘We think that the approach of saying that we should support universities, but young people going to universities need to make a contribution to their education, is right. I think in the past, where frankly quite well-off people went to university like me, for free, paid for by people leaving school at 16 and paying their taxes, that wasn’t right. But look, if people want to protest, of course they have that right, what they don’t have the right to do is to assault police officers, smash up property and threaten people who are just going about their daily lives.’‘

Authorities have said the trouble was caused by a hardcore minority. The trouble saw around 50 arrests and several police officers hurt.

An inquiry into the handling of the demonstration has been launched following accusations police underestimated the threat of violence.