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World Cup mixes work and play


World Cup mixes work and play


For South African businesses, the World Cup presents the problem of letting fans watch the action without productivity being too badly effected.

Workers at the General Motors car plant in Port Elizabeth got to see the opening game between South Africa and Mexico because they were allowed to finish their work day early downing tools to pick up their vuvuzelas.

GM has worked hard to ensure a balance between work and play.

The carmakers’ South Africa spokeswoman Denise Van Huyssteen said: “We realised quite a while ago that this will be quite a big deal for our employees, so we have had discussions with our employees. And together we have agreed to revise working hours so that we can accommodate the games.”

The company’s production line workers and those from its parts and accessories warehouses get to start their shifts one hour earlier on the days South Africa are playing and also on those days that games take place in Port Elizabeth where GM is one of the biggest private sector employers.

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