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Mixed fortunes in Central Europe

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Mixed fortunes in Central Europe

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The centre-right People’s party has polled 29.7 of the vote in the Austrian elections for the European Parliament. This is down from the last elections in 2004, but their losses are not as serious as their coalition partners the Social Democrats, whose vote slumped to their worst-ever national result. They polled 23.8%. Between them they have 11 seats.
 
The Greens also lost ground, winning only 9.5% of the vote, worth one seat.
 
A eurosceptic party, the “Liste Martin“  scooped 17.9% to become the country’s third party with three seats. 
 
The right-wing populist Freedom Party, founded by the late Jörg Haider but which he later quit polled 13.1%, and obtained two seats. The party he led at his death, “The Alliance for the Future” picked up 4.8% and failed to win a seat.
 
In Hungary the opposition Fidesz Civic Union conservatives triumphed with a landslide 56.37 of the vote, an improvement on the 47.4% that they won in 2004. The result means they will be sending 14 MEPs to Brussels.
 
The ruling Socialist party only polled 17.38% of the vote, meaning they will be sending 4 MEPs to Brussels.
 
The far-right Jobbik party surged into third place with 14.77% and will have three MEPs. Voter turnout was low, at 36.29% as opposed to the 38.5% of the electorate who turned out in 2004.
 
Poland’s ruling liberal Civic Platform party was the overall winner in the elections for the European Parliament winning 44.39% of the vote.
The conservative Law and Justice party trailed in second with 27.41% of the votes.
 
The coalition of the Democratic Left Alliance (SLD) won 12.33% and the People’s Party, the Liberal’s coalition allies, won 7.03%.
 
In Slovakia the ruling leftist SMER Social Democrats won 32.02% of the vote, double that of their nearest rivals, increasing their seats from 3 to 5.
 
The SNS Slovakian National Party, strongly xenophobic, anti-Hungarian and anti-Romanian, picked up 5.5% of the vote, less than feared ahead of the vote.
 
There is ancient tension between Slovakia and neighbouring Hungary. Voter turnout was 19.64%, the lowest in the EU, but a little higher than in 2004 when it was 17%.
  
In the Czech Republic the conservative Civic Democrats party won the EU vote taking 31.45% of the vote, unexpectedly turning the tables on the leftist Social Democrats, who got 22.38%. The parties win 9 and 7 seats respectively.